A descriptive approach to reverse mentoring as a practice to help organizations understand and manage generational differences in the workplace

  • Today’s workplace is composed of three different generations, which are considered to be substantially different from each other. Popular press and academics defend that neglecting to address these differences can generate negative organizational outcomes. Therefore, there is a growing body of research recommending generational specific practices to minimize the effects of generational differences in organizations. Nevertheless, not every practice tends to be based on empirical evidence on generational differences, which raises doubts about its effectiveness. The goal of this paper is to propose reverse mentoring as a practice to help organizations understand and manage generational differences better. To achieve this goal, a summary of published secondary data on empirical evidence of generational differences in the workplace was gathered, and the findings were linked to the function/outcomes of reverse mentoring, which allowed for the practice to be recommended based on substantial empirical evidence. Moreover, primary qualitative research was gathered through interviews to support the findings. Despite the limitations encountered, reverse mentoring is proved to be a long-term beneficial tool to understand and manage generational differences in the workplace.

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Metadaten
Author:Barbara Faber
Advisor:Nikola Hale
Document Type:Bachelor Thesis
Language:English
Year of Completion:2018
Granting Institution:Hochschule Furtwangen
Date of final exam:2018/02/07
Release Date:2018/02/14
Tag:Generational Differences; Generations; Millennials; Reverse Mentoring
Degree Program:IBM - International Business Management
Functional area:Human Resource Management
Access Rights:Innerhalb der Hochschule
Licence (German):License LogoEs gilt das UrhG